Hide this

How You Can Get More From One Hydroponics Super-Plant Than From Twenty Smaller Plants!

Build a layer cake of nutrients in your hydroponics root zone Build a layer cake of nutrients in your hydroponics root zone

If you want total predictability and control in your hydroponics gardening, you go for rockwool, aeroponics, hydroton, NFT or a similar root zone strategy that provides you a neutral root zone. Only in that neutral situation using reverse osmosis water can you be 100% sure what hydroponics nutrients elements your plants are getting. Because your hydroponics plants give you your heaviest and most valuable yields when you use hydroponics nutrients systems that feed specific ratios of nutrients timed to the phase of growth your plants are in, the neutral approach is especially valuable.

On the other hand, there‘s a different approach that’s becoming more popular, especially with growers who can do outdoor-indoor or greenhouse gardens, or who have lots of space in their indoor grow room. Some people call this the super-plants approach. The typical procedure is to have fewer plants, and grow them in massive containers, such as 20-gallon pots or larger garbage cans.

You start by punching holes in the bottom of the garbage can to allow drainage, and obviously you need some way to handle floor drainage when water runs out of the containers. Some growers don’t punch those holes and they have to be extra careful what they use as root zone media, and how they water, so that they don’t have soggy, disease-prone areas at the bottom of their root zones.

But if you want massive plants that can yield double, triple, or even quadruple more than plants grown in typical rockwool drip irrigation systems, you use all that room for roots to provide your plants layers of nutrition.

How you craft your root zone media in the super-plants approach can be quite fun, although it is also an experiment. If you want absolute predictability, stick with a neutral root zone and synthetic hydroponics nutrients systems.

But if you want massive plants that can yield double, triple, or even quadruple more than plants grown in typical rockwool drip irrigation systems, you use all that room for roots to provide your plants layers of nutrition.

It’s kind of like building a layer cake. Think about what your plants need as they grow, and then provide them layers of root zone materials that best satisfy their needs.

At the top of the barrel, you layer in a nitrogen-rich balanced material such as Fox Farm Ocean Forest. But you also mix in granulated root zone beneficial microbes to stimulate early root zone growth.

A foot or two down, mix in a layer of kelp, small amounts of aged guano, but make it thin. To prompt your roots to dig deep, every so often mix in a thin layer of perlite (extra coarse is great) so your plants get to the layer, realize there are no nutrients in it, and go for the gold beneath.

You always want your plants to have a rich, balanced, fresh layer of media such as Ocean Forest within a few inches of their roots so there’s always something predictable and easy for them to access.

As your plants age, you’ll trigger them into bloom cycle, so make sure the layers you provide further down the barrel are enriched in flower-building potassium and phosphorus.

What are the benefits? Bigger roots equal bigger yields. You’ll be growing hydroponics “trees” that you can sit under and read a book. Use hydroponics nutrients at a reduced rate with this approach, and you will see more yield from one super-plant than you’d get from 20 smaller plants grown in SOG or SCROG!!

Follow Us:

Thinking of expanding your closet grow into a bigger op? Get tips on expanding your business here.

Need the scoop on Bloom Boosters? Get expert analysis here.

Want the scoop on the coolest lighting gear? Read this article and improve your crop.

Follow Rosebud Magazine on Twitter – click here.

© Copyright RosebudMag.com, 2011



To create link towards this article on your website,
copy and paste the text below in your page.




Preview :


Powered by Rosebudmag © 2020
Follow Rosebud Magazine on Twitter Check out the Rosebud Magazine Facebook
Share this article with your friends, family and co-workers
Understanding the science of soil in hydroponics
Last modified on Monday, 30 July 2012 16:28

© Rosebud Magazine, 2010 - 2018 | All rights reserved.

Login or Register

LOG IN